Monday, September 8, 2014

The CITIZENSHIP Project

What do the words "CITIZEN" and "CITIZENSHIP" mean to you? What are the different kinds of citizenship? We will explore the definitions of CITIZEN and CITIZENSHIP in this project, and ultimately connect this to the concept of citizenship in the Roman Empire, in the empires of Islam, and later on in Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment-era Europe.

SO WHAT CAN I DO?
It's your choice. I would start by Googling the words CITIZEN and CITIZENSHIP and see what comes up. Do a Google Image search (http://images.google.com), then do a Google News search (http://news.google.com) for each of these words. Find a topic that you think will be interesting for you to explore, and interesting for the class to hear about. Potential topics for you to explore:

  • What is the process for you to become a citizen of the United States?
  • What does good citizenship mean here at Sierra Vista?
  • What did it mean to be a citizen of the Roman Republic?
  • Tell the story of someone you would consider to be a "model citizen"?
  • What does the phrase "digital citizenship" mean?
  • What does the phrase "global citizenship" mean?
  • What kind of work does CHIRLA do?
  • We expect Americans to be "informed citizens"? What does this mean?
  • Tell the story of a student who got an award for being a "Good Citizen."
  • Survey several people to ask them what the word "citizen" or "citizenship" means to them. Take photos of the people you interview and share their thoughts.
  • If you have artist friends, ask them to draw what "citizen" or "citizenship" means to them. Scan their art and discuss it in your presentation.
  • What kind of work does Project Citizen do for young people?
  • What kind of work does the Central Coast Citizenship Project do?
  • What rights and responsibilities do American citizens have?


THE FORMAT
You will format your presentation as a PechaKucha talk. PechaKucha is a presentation format designed to bring interesting people and interesting ideas together. It started in Tokyo in 2003, and is a 20x20 presentation, meaning you present 20 slides and you have 20 seconds to present each slide. The format requires you to practice your timing. You generally do not put any words on the slides. The slides contain images only. You should either have your presentation memorized, have some bullet point notes for each slide, or have a script for each slide. Some examples of PechaKucha talks are at the bottom of this blog post.

THE PROJECT
The project itself may be done by yourself, or with one partner. PechaKucha talks are usually done alone, but for this first time you may have a partner.

THE DUE DATE
Your project should be ready to present on Thursday, September 18, 2014.

SIGN-UP
This Above and Beyond project is OPTIONAL. If you complete it successfully by following the format and presenting it to your class, you will earn one Above and Beyond point (that gets you a little closer to an A). If you record audio and prepare it to be published worldwide, you will get TWO Above and Beyond points.






SOME PECHAKUCHA TALKS GIVEN BY KIDS AROUND THE WORLD
http://www.pechakucha.org/channels/kids/presentations/art-evolution
http://www.pechakucha.org/channels/kids/presentations/alfie
http://www.pechakucha.org/channels/kids/presentations/cricket-for-dummies

SOME PECHAKUCHA TALKS GIVEN BY ADULTS
http://www.pechakucha.org/presentations/sprinkling-pixie-dust**
http://www.pechakucha.org/presentations/from-daydreams-to-ink-and-pixels


**this is a fascinating first-hand account of a college student's experience learning about customer service and the "guest experience" working at Walt Disney World. He does let one expletive slip out (a naughty word for poop). Be forewarned. Other than that, it's a great presentation!

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